4paws4you.com » Pet Safety & Recalls » Poisonous house plants affecting pets (dogs and cats)

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Lilies_poisonous_to_cats Here is a quick reference guide to the more common house and garden plants and foods that are toxic to our dogs, cats – most all animals and children. If you have these plants or foods, you need not dispose of them-just keep them away from pets and children. (*substances are especially dangerous and can be fatal).

 

Pictured here: Lilies
Members of the Lilium spp. are considered to be highly toxic to cats. While the poisonous component has not yet been identified, it is clear that with even ingestion of very small amounts of the plant, severe kidney damage could result.
Cardiovascular Toxins
Avocado (leaves, seeds, stem, skin)*
Azalea (entire rhododendron family)
Autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale)*
Bleeding heart*
Castor bean*
Foxglove (Digitalis)*
Kalanchoe*
Lily-of-the-valley*
Milkweed*
Mistletoe berries*
Mountain laurel
Oleander *
Rosary Pea*
Yew*

Gastrointestinal Toxins
Amaryllis bulb*
Azalea (entire rhododendron family)
Autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale)*
Bird of Paradise
Bittersweet
Boxwood
Buckeye
Buttercup (Ranunculus)
Caffeine
Castor bean*
Chocolate *
Chrysanthemum (a natural source of pyrethrins)
Clematis
Crocus bulb
Croton (Codiaeum sp.)
Cyclamen bulb
Dumb cane (Dieffenbachia)*
English ivy (All Hedera species of ivy)
Garlic*
Hyacinth bulbs
Holly berries
Iris corms
Lily (bulbs of most species)
Marijuana or hemp (Cannabis)*
Narcissus, daffodil (Narcissus)
Onions*
Pencil cactus/plant*
Potato (leaves and stem)
Rosary Pea*
Spurge (Euphorbia sp.)
Tomatoes (leaves and stem)

Respiratory Toxin
Almonds*
Apricot*
Cherries*
Chinese sacred or heavenly bamboo*
Dumb cane (Dieffenbachia)*
Elderberry, unripe berries*
Hydrangea*
Jimson weed*
Peaches*

Neurological Toxins
Alcohol (all beverages, ethanol, methanol, isopropyl)
Amaryllis bulb*
Azalea (entire rhododendron family)
Bracken fern
Buckeye
Caffeine
Castor bean*
Chocolate*
Choke cherry, unripe berries*
Chrysanthemum (natural source of pyrethrins)
Crocus bulb
Delphinium, larkspur, monkshood*
Lupine species
Marijuana or hemp (Cannabis)*
Mistletoe berries*
Morning glory*
Poinsettia
Potato (leaves and stem)
Rosary Pea*
Tomatoes (leaves and stem)

Kidney/Organ Failure Toxins
Anthurium*
Begonia*
Caladium*
Calla lily*
Jack-in-the-pulpit*
Lantana*
Oak*
Philodendron*
Rhubarb leaves*
Scheffelera*
Shamrock*

What should pet owners do if they suspect their animal has ingested a poisonous plant? What symptoms should they look for?

If a pet owner suspects that their animal ingested a poisonous plant, they should contact their veterinarian immediately. It’s advised to bring in part of the to a nursery for identification if the exact species is not known. Symptoms of poisonings can include almost any clinical sign. The animal may even appear completely normal for several hours or for days.

Posted by Ipaws.com

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